Mayoral & Council Candidates Q&A

Kapiti Health Advisory Group recently sent a set of four questions relating to the provision

of health services in our area to Mayoral and Council Candidates for the 2022 Elections to

Kapiti Coast District Council.


We are happy to provide their responses below.


Mayoral Candidates:


Martin Halliday

Q1. The new health legislation, Te Pae Ora, requires the development of a Locality Health Plan

for each locality. Assuming that Kapiti will be a locality, how do you see Kapiti Coast District

Council (KCDC) participating in the formulation, management and monitoring of the Plan? 

 

Answer: As a district we need to be advocating strongly for Kapiti to be in the next

tranche of Localities to be rolled out as part of the Health Reform outputs. Health is a Central

Government responsibility and as such is funded via taxation. One of my concerns in this

space is that of unfunded mandates coming out of the Central Government through all

the various reforms. If KCDC is to have a place (as per the new legislation) then who pays for

this? It should not be expected to come out of our rates dollars and in my opinion, it is

already an issue. 


I fully support having a MOU or some other "Partnership" with an independent community group that is a voice to advocate for Kapiti Residents in this reform and I think KHAG is perfectly placed to be this group. Even though I have had the Portfolio for health over the past three years, which by the way has allowed me to get a very informed view of how KHAG works, I still don't see a plan or guidelines from Central Govt as to how Local Govt is supposed to "Fit in" here. That to me is very disconcerting and worrying.


Kapiti has some fantastic organisations working in health, especially in the area of Maori

health provision, but an ongoing issue has been the separation in Kapiti of Otaki via the

health board borders. This may have now been removed, but this will potentially lead to a

split rather than unified approach. What's best for Kapiti? That needs to be the district wide

approach.


KCDC will be a connector and have an advocacy / lobbying role in this new space in my

opinion, but it has to be careful not to get too caught up and use too many resources that

will detract from other Council core deliverables, This is where I emphasis the the potential 

importance of KHAG as an independent voice for our community, supported by KCDC.


The plan itself will be potentially developed by various groups such as Maanaki Kapit, Hora

Te Pai, Health providers, professionals and deliverers as well as the Kapiti Community

Health Network in conjunction with both of the new entities


Q2. The new health legislation recognises that social well being is a major contributor to

health.  What role do you believe KCDC should play in social well being for Kapiti?


Answer: Council already plays a role in delivery of the four well beings as Central Govt

legislated this a while ago, (did I mention funding). The four well beings are embedded into

our long term plan which flows down to the annual plan and all policies and strategies either

new or being reviewed and updated.


Q3. Do you believe that KCDC should have an explicit policy statement on how it is going to

implement its wellbeing obligations under the Local Government Act and if so, what do you

regard as priorities?


Answer: As I noted in the last question, KCDC already has this embedded. Holding KCDC to

account for these provisions could be one of the responsibilities of a community lead group

in this space if they decided it to be an issue to address.


One priority I have with regards to the wider picture of health is HEALTHY HOMES, If we get

housing right, then there are multiple outcomes that will have huge positive benefits to our

communities and health system. Houses of various sizes, that are warm, healthy, accessible

and safe lead to positive outcomes in both mental, physical and social well being for the

entire region.


I also regard proactive positive relationship building and advocacy will be very important if

Kapiti wants to receive its share of the health pie. These are skills I will bring to the table.


Q4. Do you agree that in order to reflect the views of its constituents on what they consider to

be the priorities for the district’s health service the Council will need advice and information

from a genuinely representative community group such as the Kapiti Health Advisory

Group?


Answer: I 100% agree.



Janet Holborow

Q1. The new health legislation, Te Pae Ora, requires the development of a Locality Health Plan

for each locality.  Assuming that Kapiti will be a locality, how do you see Kapiti Coast District

Council (KCDC) participating in the formulation, management and monitoring of the Plan?


Answer: We need to work closely with our community health providers, social organisations

and iwi to make the most of this opportunity. We need to push for the adequate funding and

set bold goals for improving health outcomes in the district.


Q2. The new health legislation recognises that social well being is a major contributor to

health.  What role do you believe KCDC should play in social well being for Kapiti?


Answer: Council has a major role to play in social well-being. We already allocate funding

through our Social Investment programme. We need to allocate funding for Business as

Usual funding as well as projects in my view. Too often organisations which are already

stretched have to increase their work programme to attract funding.


Q3. Do you believe that KCDC should have an explicit policy statement on how it is going to

implement its wellbeing obligations under the Local Government Act and if so, what do you

regard as priorities?


Answer: We could be more explicit and strong around our social well-being approach in our

Long-term Plan. As Mayor I would bring together our community stakeholders and Iwi to

agree an approach and priorities. Priorities include a healthy food guidelines and regulations

in our facilities, action around mental well-being, how we support our social organisations,

and how we ensure everyone has access to warm, healthy housing.


Q4. Do you agree that in order to reflect the views of its constituents on what they consider to

be the priorities for the district’s health service the Council will need advice and information

from a genuinely representative community group such as the Kapiti Health Advisory

Group?


Answer: The Kāpiti Health Advisory Group needs to be further strengthened and supported

as we consider and deliver our approach to locality plans and well-being priorities. The group

needs to be supported to engage with community providers, develop policy and set and

achieve health outcome goals.



Council Candidates:


Ian Powell

Q1. The new health legislation, Te Pae Ora, requires the development of a Locality Health Plan

for each locality. Assuming that Kapiti will be a locality, how do you see Kapiti Coast District

Council (KCDC) participating in the formulation, management and monitoring of the Plan? 

 

Answer: First, KCDC should lobby Te Whatu Ora (Health New Zealand)hard to ensure that

Kapiti is a locality with the same geographic boundary. This boundary is well suited for a

geographically definable boundary. There are two immediate problems, however, with

localities. One is that planning where they will be is very slow. Te Whatu Ora is poorly

prepared for their implementation and the 80 nationwide localities will be slowly rolled out

between now and July 2024 (only about 9 to date and even then embryonic).


The second is that the membership of locality leadership will be decided by Te Whatu Ora

which will also determine its locality plan with only formal consultation with the locality.

Consequently KCDC should be prepared to develop what it believes should be in a locality

plan in advance of the formation of our locality, whenever and whatever that might be.


Once the locality is formed KCDC should endeavour to constructively engage with it to

continue this work in anticipation of Te Whatu Ora’s decision-making. If it is necessary KCDC

should try to provide backbone to the locality’s leadership. Regardless of the locality,

however, KCDC should adopt the position of being the local statutory voice for accessible

healthcare services for Kapiti. If elected I would also insist that KCDC actively engages with

and involves KHAG in all these activities.


Q2. The new health legislation recognises that social well being is a major contributor to

health.  What role do you believe KCDC should play in social well being for Kapiti?


Answer: KCDC must play a central role in the social wellbeing of Kapiti’s population. A big

part of this is doing its bit to reducing the impact of social determinants of health which,

while external to the health system, are the biggest driver of both healthcare demand and

healthcare costs. Taking further KCDC’s good work on improving housing supply and safety is

a starting point. Becoming a living wage employer for its own staff and then encouraging

Kapiti employers to do likewise is another. Identifying where access to specific community

and hospital health services needs improvement is also part of this role; first identify and

then pursue with Te Whatu Ora. It will require a focus on population (public) health, as well

as personal health (diagnosis and treatment) including healthy living.


Q3. Do you believe that KCDC should have an explicit policy statement on how it is going to

implement its wellbeing obligations under the Local Government Act and if so, what do you

regard as priorities?


Answer: KCDC having an explicit policy statement on implementing its wellbeing obligations

is a good idea. My suggested priorities would be climate change, access to health services

(including a particular emphasis on mental health services in this instance), and external

social determinants of health such as income and housing.


Q4. Do you agree that in order to reflect the views of its constituents on what they consider to

be the priorities for the district’s health service the Council will need advice and information

from a genuinely representative community group such as the Kapiti Health Advisory Group?


Answer: I don’t just agree. I absolutely agree. I’m impressed with your work. More than this,

however, I have a very strong view that the more communities are empowered to engage with KCDC, the better the latter’s decision-making will be. Actively engaging with KHAG will be essential if I am to be successful over health as a district-wide councillor.



Martin Frauenstein

Q1. The new health legislation, Te Pae Ora, requires the development of a Locality Health Plan

for each locality.  Assuming that Kapiti will be a locality, how do you see Kapiti Coast District

Council (KCDC) participating in the formulation, management and monitoring of the Plan?


Answer: There should be a sub-committee tasked with ensuring that there is a co-ordinated

effort in ensuring all Kapiti residents are informed of progress of the reforms. Work / requirements need to be sort from the community before Te Whatu Ora "tells us" what we are going to get. If Kapiti Coast via KCDC do not act now Kapiti Residents will not get the

services they require.


Q2. The new health legislation recognises that social well being is a major contributor to

health.  What role do you believe KCDC should play in social well being for Kapiti?


Answer: Recognise that they have a role to play and inquire of the community what they

need. Then deliver to that need.


Q3. Do you believe that KCDC should have an explicit policy statement on how it is going to

implement its wellbeing obligations under the Local Government Act and if so, what do you

regard as priorities?


Answer: No the act is sufficient. The district plan needs to reflect the council's response as

required.


Q4. Do you agree that in order to reflect the views of its constituents on what they consider to

be the priorities for the district’s health service the Council will need advice and information

from a genuinely representative community group such as the Kapiti Health Advisory

Group?


Answer: Having yet to sight the Terms of Reference for the KHAG, I do imaging they should

be orchestrating or at least playing a constructive role. Expressed in another way, KHAG

leading the community to the desired community outcome.



Sophie Handford

Q1. The new health legislation, Te Pae Ora, requires the development of a Locality Health Plan

for each locality.  Assuming that Kapiti will be a locality, how do you see Kapiti Coast District

Council (KCDC) participating in the formulation, management and monitoring of the Plan?


Answer: I see Council playing a facilitatory and enabling role in ensuring our community’s views and visions in the health sector are represented and acted upon. We must work collaboratively

and proactively alongside the representative groups in Kāpiti, such as KHAG, the Youth Council, the Older Person’s Council, the Accessibility Advisory Group. I see Council coordinating hui between these groups, connecting relevant parties and supporting to oversee the development and implementation of the Plan itself, alongside our health providers, and advisory and community groups. The Review into the Future for Local Government is going to be one crucial strategy program that will help inform and increase clarity around what Council’s across Aotearoa should be in supporting this mahi. Alongside this, I believe we need to position Kāpiti ahead of the curve by involving ourselves in the process and actively pushing for our region's needs, recognizing the importance of this health plan to our long term vision for Kāpiti. After all, health is a key foundation to thriving lives.


Q2. The new health legislation recognises that social well being is a major contributor to

health.  What role do you believe KCDC should play in social well being for Kapiti?


Answer: Social well-being is one of the four well beings which are core business of Council, and we need to ensure that its importance and considerations are embedded across all of our mahi.

Council has an important role in supporting the stellar work already being done by community and social sector organisations, and volunteer groups across the district such as Kāpiti Youth Support, Te Ara Korowai, PaeCycle and the Paekakariki Community Garden. I see it to be vital that Council ensures focus on the well-being & mana of our diverse communities and supports our most vulnerable. Enabling greener, more sustainable and accessible townships, which prioritise active modes of transport is also a commitment we must make to uplifting the social well being of our community. A strong partnership with iwi at the core of our pathway forwards is a commitment to social wellbeing, just as providing vibrant public spaces and fostering a humming vibe within our community is. Additionally, it is crucial to consider the fact that the four well beings are inextricably connected and thus we must ensure our approach is holistic.


Q3. Do you believe that KCDC should have an explicit policy statement on how it is going to

implement its wellbeing obligations under the Local Government Act and if so, what do you

regard as priorities?


Answer: Yes. Ensuring our wellbeing commitments are both front of mind and clearly communicated to the wider district is the best way to achieve our visions for the health sector and ensure Council is held accountable. I would regard the priorities to be multifaceted, and encompass all four of well-beings, social, environmental, cultural and economic. I’d like to see Council commiting to leading Kāpiti to carbon neutrality by 2040 and developing a plan alongside

the community to get us there, fast tracking and furthering our mahi in the housing space, getting houses built for the people who need them most in partnership with a Community

Land trust and iwi and the bringing together of Council and the community to foster increased collaboration on the wider vision for our district. Within these priorities, I see the four well beings reflected and able to be addressed at their intersections.


Q4. Do you agree that in order to reflect the views of its constituents on what they consider to

be the priorities for the district’s health service the Council will need advice and information

from a genuinely representative community group such as the Kapiti Health Advisory

Group?


Answer: Yes. The mahi that the KHAG have delivered over the last 5 years has been invaluable to

supporting and representing our community. Their advice is both something we need to leverage in the future and support so they are able to continue representing and giving back to the community. We should seek to receive advice and information from a wide range of health services / community groups across the Kāpiti district to ensure our diverse population is represented as health service delivery evolves.



Nigel Wilson

Q1. The new health legislation, Te Pae Ora, requires the development of a Locality Health Plan

for each locality.  Assuming that Kapiti will be a locality, how do you see Kapiti Coast District

Council (KCDC) participating in the formulation, management and monitoring of the Plan?


Answer: I doubt KCDC itself has the expertise to put together such a plan without heavy

consultation with groups in our community who do have the expertise, such as the Kapiti

Health Advisory Group.


Q2. The new health legislation recognises that social well being is a major contributor to

health.  What role do you believe KCDC should play in social well being for Kapiti?


Answer: I agree that social well being is a major contributor to health, and for six years I

chaired the Social Well being committee of Greater Wellington Regional Council. KCDC

should play a significant role in enhancing social well being for Kapiti. Having an inclusive

policy setting is a great start. Looking after our most vulnerable and providing resources in

such areas as social housing are part of that.


Q3. Do you believe that KCDC should have an explicit policy statement on how it is going to

implement its wellbeing obligations under the Local Government Act and if so, what do you

regard as priorities?


Answer: Yes it should. The way to define these is on a community led basis. I'm not sure

KCDC has the skills or knowledge to determine these priorities in the absence of input from

the various communities that make up Kapiti.


Q4. Do you agree that in order to reflect the views of its constituents on what they consider to

be the priorities for the district’s health service the Council will need advice and information

from a genuinely representative community group such as the Kapiti Health Advisory

Group?


Answer: Absolutely yes. The skills and knowledge for this do not reside inside council. It is

vital that groups such as KHAG are fully engaged.



Lawrence Kirby

Q1. The new health legislation, Te Pae Ora, requires the development of a Locality Health Plan

for each locality.  Assuming that Kapiti will be a locality, how do you see Kapiti Coast District

Council (KCDC) participating in the formulation, management and monitoring of the Plan?


Answer: I think access to affordable, effective healthcare is vital to the wellbeing of our

District. I think Council has a strong role to play in this process but probably in an enabling

way rather than a "doing it" way. In my opinion Council needs to be closely monitoring the Health Plan ensuring that it is realistic, workable and meets the diverse needs of our District

in an ongoing manner.


Q2. The new health legislation recognises that social well being is a major contributor to

health.  What role do you believe KCDC should play in social well being for Kapiti?


Answer: I am active in the Social & Community Sector and social wellbeing is core to our

Sector's kaupapa. I want the Council to continue to have a prominent place in the Sector -

supporting, advising, funding (in some way) and empowering our communities to lead

initiatives that increase social wellbeing.


Q3. Do you believe that KCDC should have an explicit policy statement on how it is going to

implement its wellbeing obligations under the Local Government Act and if so, what do you

regard as priorities?


Answer: Yes, we need to have a clear vision about the health and wellbeing of our District.

My priorities: affordable, accessible health care especially mental health services; a capable

social & community sector; community-led development - empowering communities to care

for themselves.


Q4. Do you agree that in order to reflect the views of its constituents on what they consider to

be the priorities for the district’s health service the Council will need advice and information

from a genuinely representative community group such as the Kapiti Health Advisory

Group?


Answer: Yes, the voice of the community must be heard and listened to. A genuinely

representative community group would help tremendously with that.



Bernie Randall

I have always supported the Health Advisory Group from day 1. I believe KCDC should give

formal recognition to KHAG.


We need to see the direction of Te Pae Ora and it’s structure. It’s not clear whether Kapiti

will have its own locality Health Plan but I would fully support it.


KHAG has done a great job and the Council should heed the advice and information that

KHAG can provide.



piti Coast Constituency - Greater Wellington Regional Council Candidates:


Asher Wilson-Goodman

Q1. The new health legislation, Te Pae Ora, requires the development of a Locality Health Plan

for each locality.  Assuming that Kapiti will be a locality, how do you see Kapiti Coast District

Council (KCDC) participating in the formulation, management and monitoring of the Plan?


Answer: KCDC and Greater Wellington Regional Council both need to play a key role in coordinating public input into the Locality Health Plan for Kāpiti once one is developed, but they also have a role to play prior to this in advocating for Kāpiti to become a locality sooner rather than later. With no hospital-level care or primary care available after 10pm in Kāpiti, we are a

prime territory to be an early adopter of the locality model to support our communities to

drive extra investment in our health system.


Q2. The new health legislation recognises that social well being is a major contributor to

health.  What role do you believe KCDC should play in social well being for Kapiti?


Answer: Greater Wellington Regional Council has a critical role to play in improving social

wellbeing. One way it can do this is through improved public transport, which enhances

community connectedness and helps to reduce loneliness and isolation. This is proven to

improve overall wellbeing, particularly for those most at-risk of isolation such as new parents

and older people, both of which are groups that are overrepresented amongst Kāpiti’s population.


Another tool for improving social wellbeing is the provision of regional parks and recreational areas in nature. Greater Wellington has a dual role to play here. One is direct, the provision of open spaces such as Queen Elizabeth Park and the Waikanae River and Ōtaki River trails. The other is indirect, through providing support and enabling the wonderful work of our many volunteer-based biodiversity groups who help to improve the natural environment for all of us to enjoy.


Q3. Do you believe that KCDC should have an explicit policy statement on how it is going to

implement its wellbeing obligations under the Local Government Act and if so, what do you

regard as priorities?


Answer: Now that the wellbeing obligations have been returned to the Local Government

Act, every council should have a high-level statement about the ways in which they will seek to promote them. Greater Wellington has a strong role to play in all four, alongside mana

whenua partners and territorial authorities, to further the wellbeing of our whole region.


Q4. Do you agree that in order to reflect the views of its constituents on what they consider to

be the priorities for the district’s health service the Council will need advice and information

from a genuinely representative community group such as the Kapiti Health Advisory

Group?


Answer: Community engagement in all matters is a critical role for both councils and councillors. This needs to happen at both a broad level (e.g. public consultation and engagement) and at a targeted level (e.g. consultation and engagement from established groups of experts / with relevant knowledge). KHAG is a good example of the latter and their involvement will be critical as our district moves towards a locality model and takes full advantage of the reforming health system to improve health outcomes for all of our residents.